Apr
25
Apr 28

Lutheran Service in America Annual Conference Keynote Speaker

  • HILTON MINNEAPOLIS, Minneapolis, MN

2016 LSA Annual Conference
Coming Together: Building the Path, Shining the Light
Join us in Minnesota in April to celebrate the strength of our Lutheran social ministry network at our Annual Conference!

LSA's largest event, the Annual Conference is a yearly gathering that convenes nonprofit leaders, staff, Board members and faith leaders to build on and celebrate LSA's national, strong and trusted network, bringing together hundreds of nonprofit Lutheran social ministry leaders united in the mission of transforming lives and communities. 

This year's conference – Coming Together: Building the Path, Shining the Light – reflects on our strong network. Together, we are building the future for Lutheran social ministry, and lighting the way so that we may bring hope to more lives, as well as build awareness of the work of our diverse network of members.

Apr
15
12:00 pm12:00

The City Club of Cleveland

  • THE CITY CLUB OF CLEVELAND, Cleavland, OH

According to the United States (U.S.) Census Bureau, in 2014 there were 46.7 million people - 14 percent of the U.S. population - living in poverty. Within this 14 percent, approximately one and a half million households - including three million children - live in what can be considered extreme poverty, existing on just two dollars per person, per day and without substantial government assistance. These individuals resort selling plasma, selling their food stamps and sometimes, even selling sex, to secure the necessary cash to make ends meet. What does it mean to live virtually cashless in one of the world's most capitalistic nations?
 
Join us for the next installment in our Resilient Families series, a conversation with Kathryn J. Edin, Ph.D., Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University and author of $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, on the plight of Americans living in extreme poverty.
 
Tickets: $20 members/$35 nonmembers

Apr
8
8:00 am08:00

Better Health Partnership Collaborative Keynote in Cleveland

  • Cuyahoga Community College Warrensville Heights OH

Featuring Keynote Speaker
Kathryn J. Edin
Co-author of $2 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America

Sociologist Kathryn Edin, PhD, studies poverty and has pursued key mysteries about the urban poor using ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews, and other approaches to provide insights to welfare and low-wage work, family life, and neighborhood contexts. How do single mothers possibly survive on welfare? Why don’t more go to work? Why do they end up as single mothers in the first place? Where are the fathers and why do they disengage from their children’s lives? How have the lives of the single mothers changed as a result of welfare reform?

Edin is a Distinguished Bloomberg Professor in the Department of Sociology, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. She serves on the Department of Health and Human Services advisory committee for the poverty research centers at Michigan, Wisconsin, and Stanford. Edin is a founding member of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Network on Housing and Families with Young Children and a past member of the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. In 2014 she became a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.

Feb
24
8:30 am08:30

ML922 Symposium: Creating Opportunity Through Collaboration

  • NeighborWorks America, Washington, D.C.

A day for exploring ways to work across sectors to improve lives.

Morning Keynote

AMERICAN JOBS AND THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING CHALLENGE

H. Luke Shaefer, “$2 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America”

Moderated Discussion with respondents

VISION 2025: A LOOK BACK AT THE DECADE WE INCREASED JOB AND HOUSING SECURITY FOR AMERICAN FAMILIES

Moderator
Carol Naughton, President, Purpose Built Communities

Speakers
H. Luke Shaefer, “$2 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America”
Nathaniel Smith, Founder and Chief Equity Officer, Partnership
for Southern Equity
Robert Doar, Morgridge Fellow in Poverty Studies at the American Enterprise Institute

Feb
17
7:00 pm19:00

An Evening with the Author of “$2.00 A Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America”

  • St. John's Episcopal Church, Royal Oak, MI

Dr. Luke Schaefer, co-author of "$2 A Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America", presents major ideas from the book at St. John's on Wednesday, Feb 17 at 7:00pm. This will be our first Lenten Series (on overlooked impact of poverty), but it's free and open to the public.  The presentation will take place in the church. Please help us spread the word!

Shaefer's work had been highly acclaimed;  he's been interviewed on NPR, many newspapers, and is coming off a major book tour. He is a noted researcher and professor at the University of Michigan (and happens to be an Episcopalian).

A few copies of the book for sale for $15 at church beginning this Sunday. The book is also available on Amazon.com and a major booksellers and at independent book stores.

Feb
11
Feb 13

Partnering with Parents to Help Children

  • Capital Hilton, Washington, D.C.

Plenary Speaker at Policy Forum of the National Child Support Enforcement Association

The NCSEA Policy Forum is an essential event for child support professionals interested in policy and the broad issues impacting the child support program. We will continue to focus on changing family demographics in America, as well as the significant societal issues that affect our program and the families we serve.

Feb
1
12:00 pm12:00

Hunger, Faith & Food Conference 2016

  • University Park United Methodist Church Denver, CO

Please join Saint John’s Cathedral, Colorado Council of Churches, Denver Urban Gardens, Ekar Farm, Grow Local Colorado, Metro Caring, Produce for Pantries, Slow Food Denver, 25 in Change, Wartburg West, and others who gather to highlight efforts communities of faith can take to provide healthy food to families in need, build resilient communities, and end hunger locally.
 
The fifth annual Hunger, Faith & Food conference, in 2016 part of the Iliff School of Theology’s alumni reunion: Renewal Conference Info.
 
12 noon – 1 pm, “The All-American Meal” (a Haves/Have-Nots dining practicum). Prepared by Executive Chef Andre Roux, 25 and Change, and Andrew Nowak, Slow Food Denver; facilitated table conversation around poverty and hunger in Denver.
 
1 pm – 1:30 pm, Keynote Address: Dr. Kathryn Edin, Distinguished Bloomberg Professor of Sociology, 21st-Century Cities Initiative, The Johns Hopkins University, and author of a NYT Notable Book of 2015: 
$2.00 a Day:  Living on Almost Nothing in America
Website:  www.twodollarsaday.com
Book Review:  www.nytimes.com/2015/09/06/books/review/2-00-a-day-by-kathryn-j-edin-and-h-luke-shaefer.html

1:30 – 3:00 — Interfaith HFF Panel (Open Space Technology Breakout Session):
“Ending Hunger Locally:  Engaging Faith in Action”.
Panelists: Professor Kathryn Edin; Ryan Galanaugh, Metro Caring Hunger Relief Center; Aaron Ney, Ekar Farm

Jan
27
9:00 am09:00

Desperate Measures: Survival Strategies of the Poorest of the Poor

  • Urban Institute

Evidence has emerged that the number of families living with little to no income has climbed over the past two decades. While the 1996 welfare reform act is considered a historic achievement for incentivizing work and reducing the number of people receiving government assistance, people currently unable to find work are left with virtually no safety net.

During this panel discussion, Kathryn Edin, sociologist and coauthor of $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, will explain why assistance programs are essentially nonexistent for many who need them most. Her work provides context for recent findings from the Urban Institute on poverty-coping mechanisms. Urban scholar Susan Popkin will discuss her work on youth in distressed communities.

Panelists:

Kathryn Edin, Bloomberg distinguished professor, Johns Hopkins University
Kimberlyn Leary, former adviser, Council on Women and Girls, White House
Susan J. Popkin, senior fellow, Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center, Urban Institute
Gregory Acs, director, Income and Benefits Policy Center, Urban Institute
 Moderator: 

Pam Fessler, correspondent, national desk, NPR

Jan
22
1:30 am01:30

Distinguished Seminar Series at Iowa State University

  • Iowa State University

The Future of Healthy Families - Kathy Edin
Thu, 03 Mar 2016, 4:00 PM – 2019 Morrill Hall - Kathryn Edin is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor in the Department of Sociology, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the lives of families in poverty. In particular she studies the domains of welfare and low-wage work, family life, and neighborhood contexts. Helen LeBaron Hilton Endowed Chair Lecture Series

Jan
21
2:00 pm14:00

The Hidden Financial Lives of America’s Poor and Middle Class

Stanford SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW

Informing and inspiring leaders of social change

Part one of two

Presented by:
Jonathan Morduch, Professor of Policy and Economics, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University
Rachel Schneider, Senior Vice President, Center for Financial Services Innovation
H. Luke Shaefer, Associate Professor, University of Michigan, School of Social Work, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Diana Elliott, Research Manager, Financial Security and Mobility, The Pew Charitable Trusts
Moderated by:
Eric Nee, Managing Editor, Stanford Social Innovation Review
Date: Thursday, January 21, 2016
Time: 11:00 a.m.-12:00 noon PDT, 2:00-3:00 p.m. EDT

What are the implications of the U.S. Financial Diaries and other recent research and how can they provide insight to help families escape poverty, build stability, move up the ladder, and invest in the future? This webinar will look at innovative policies, products, and programs that seek to help households make ends meet, build security and stability, and invest for the future. We’ll consider innovative efforts in all sectors of society—from financial tech start-ups, to new policy approaches at all levels of government, and everything in between. 
This webinar will:
Explore the results and implications of new research on the financial lives of low- and moderate-income Americans
Illustrate how month-to-month income and expense volatility can be as important as income level
Highlight findings from Pew Charitable Trust’s recent research on mobility, financial stability and security
Discuss the new challenges households face and how they are adjusting
Look at gaps in the safety net and what it means for people who fall through them
The U.S. Financial Diaries project followed more than 235 low- and moderate-income American households for a year, attempting to record every dollar earned, received, borrowed, spent, given, and lent. Luke Shaefer and his coauthor Kathryn Edin conducted intensive research on households living on less than $2.00 a day in the United States. And Pew Charitable Trusts has conducted extensive nationally representative surveys on household finances and economic mobility. Together these research initiatives provide new insight into key challenges that American households face now.
The webinar will be led by Jonathan Morduch of New York University and Rachel Schneider of the Center for Financial Services Innovation, leaders of the U.S. Financial Diaries project. They will be joined by Luke Shaefer, associate professor at the University of Michigan and coauthor of $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, and Diana Elliott of the Financial Security and Mobility program at Pew Charitable Trusts.
Thanks to the generosity of Citi Foundation, this webinar is complimentary.

Jan
20
6:30 pm18:30

Kathryn Edin @ Falmouth Service Center

  • Falmouth Academy

The Falmouth Service Center, Inc. is pleased to host Author Kathryn J. Edin as she presents insight into her acclaimed best seller.

Falmouth Academy

Morse Hall

7 Highfield Drive

Falmouth, MA  02540

Wednesday, January 20th

6:30PM

Tickets $20.00

Online at www.falmouthservicecenter.org

Eight Cousins Bookstore - 189 Main St.

100% of ticket sales donated to the Falmouth Service Center, Inc.

Oct
20
4:00 pm16:00

Center for Social Development Lecture with H. Luke Shaefer

  • Brown Lounge, Washington University in St. Louis

Join us for a lecture with H. Luke Schaefer, Associate Professor of Social Work and Associate Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan to discuss his new book, "$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America."

In their book, Kathy Edin and Luke Shaefer provide a detailed account of families who are surviving on virtually no cash income. Despite their best efforts to find work, these families have been left out of today’s labor market, and the cash safety net that might have cushioned their fall two decades ago now is almost non-existent. The book provides a powerful exposé of these families’ struggles to meet their basic needs, keep their children safe and find ways to reverse a downward spiral. In addition to telling the stories of these families, the authors offer new ideas to lift up the $2.00-a-day poor. 

This lecture is sponsored by the Center for Social Development and will be held in Brown Lounge on the second floor of Brown Hall on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

Oct
14
4:00 pm16:00

Booktalks @ The Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

  • Weill Hall, Annenberg Auditorium

Free and open to the public. Book signing and reception to follow.

This event will be live webstreamed. Check back here on the day of the event for viewing access.

Join the conversation: #policytalks

About the book:

After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn’t seen since the mid-1990s — households surviving on virtually no income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to 1.5 million American households, including about 3 million children. Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor? Edin has “turned sociology upside down” (Mother Jones) with her procurement of rich — and truthful — interviews. Through the book’s many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge.

The authors illuminate a troubling trend: a low-wage labor market that increasingly fails to deliver a living wage, and a growing but hidden landscape of survival strategies among America’s extreme poor. More than a powerful exposé, $2.00 a Day delivers new evidence and new ideas to our national debate on income inequality.

Oct
6
7:00 pm19:00

H. Luke Shaefer, co-author of $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America

  • Boswell Books

Boswell and the Community Advocates at the Public Policy Institute proudly welcome H. Luke Shaefer to Boswell for a talk and signing of his latest book, $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, an analysis of the growing portion of American poor who live on an average of $2 per day. Kirkus calls the book “[a]n eye-opening account of the lives ensnared in the new poverty cycle” and Booklist “[a] close-up, heartbreaking look at rising poverty and income inequality in the U.S.”

Oct
6
12:15 pm12:15

Demography Training Seminar - DEMSEM

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison

Kathryn Edin, Johns Hopkins and Luke Shaefer, U of Michigan - $2.00 Per Day, Living on Almost Nothing in America (**note location: 159 Education Building)

Co-sponsored with Wisconsin Hope Lab, IRP, and LaFollette

Sep
24
6:00 pm18:00

Book Talk | $2.00 A DAY: Living on Almost Nothing in America

  • Institute for Public Knowledge

The Institute for Public Knowledge and Public Books invite you to a book talk for $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America. The authors Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer will be in conversation with Jonathan Murdoch and Sudhir Venkatesh.

After two decades of groundbreaking research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn’t seen before — households surviving on virtually no cash income. Edin, whose deep examination of her subjects’ lives has “turned sociology upside down” (Mother Jones), teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on surveys of the incomes of the poor. The two made a surprising discovery: the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to one and a half million American households, including about three million children. 

But the fuller story remained to be told. Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor? What do they do to survive? In search of answers, Edin and Shaefer traveled across the country to speak with families living in this extreme poverty. Through the book’s many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge: a low-wage labor market that increasingly fails to deliver a living wage, and a growing but hidden landscape of survival strategies among America’s extreme poor. Not just a powerful exposé, $2.00 a Day delivers new evidence and new ideas to our national debate on income inequality.

Kathryn Edin is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor in the Department of Sociology, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University in 1991 and has taught at Rutgers University, Northwestern University, the University of Pennsylvania, and, most recently, Harvard University as a Professor of Public Policy and Management. She is a founding member of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Network on Housing and Families with Young Children and a past member of the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. In 2014 she became a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.

Luke Shaefer is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Social Work and Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and a research affiliate of the National Poverty Center. He received his doctoral degree at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Luke's work in the academic and public realm focuses on how we can make the U.S. social safety net as effective as possible at serving low-income families with children. His research has been widely published, and cited in such media outlets as The New York Times, National Review, USA Today, and The Washington Post.

Jonathan Morduch is Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and Managing Director of the Financial Access Initiative, a consortium of researchers focused on financial inclusion. His research centers on microfinance, social investment, and the economics of poverty. He is currently developing a theoretical framework with Jonathan Conning for understanding how governments and philanthropists can use market forces to create social change. Morduch is co-author of Portfolios of the Poor: How the World's Poor Live on $2 a Day (Princeton 2009) and The Economics of Microfinance (MIT Press 2005, 2nd edition 2010). He has taught on the Economics faculty at Harvard University, and has held visiting positions at Stanford, Princeton, and the University of Tokyo. Morduch has worked with the United Nations and World Bank, and advises global NGOs. 

Sudhir Venkatesh is the William B. Ransford Professor of Sociology, and the Committee on Global Thought, at Columbia University. He is the author of several books, including Gang Leader for a Day, Off the Books: The Underground Economy of the Urban Poor, and American Project: The Rise and Fall of a Modern Ghetto. His editorial writings have appeared in The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the Washington Post. He writes for Slate.com and his stories have appeared in This American Life, WIRED, and on National Public Radio. His next book, under contract with Penguin Press, will focus on the role of black market economies—from sex work and drug trafficking to day care and entertainment—in the revitalization of New York since 1999.

This event is co-sponsored by Public Books.

Sep
9
8:45 am08:45

$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America—A Conversation with Authors Kathy Edin and Luke Shaefer

  • Georgetown Law Center

On behalf of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) and the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality, you are invited to attend a national poverty event in Washington, DC on September 9th. The event will focus on a new book on extreme poverty in the United States that will come out on September 1, 2015. Here is a description of the book:
 
In their book, $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, Kathy Edin and Luke Shaefer provide a detailed account of families who are surviving on virtually no cash income. Despite their best efforts to find work, these families have been left out of today’s labor market and the cash safety net that might have cushioned their fall two decades ago now is almost non-existent. The book provides a powerful exposé of these families’ struggles to meet their basic needs, keep their children safe and find ways to reverse a downward spiral. In addition to telling the stories of these families, the authors offer new ideas to lift up the $2.00-a-day poor.  
 
We will begin with an informal "Meet the Authors" breakfast with Professors Edin and Shaefer and remarks by Senator Sherrod Brown, after which the authors will make a formal presentation about the book. (Copies of the book will be available for sale.)
 
Following the presentation by Edin and Shaefer, we will have remarks from Cecilia Munoz (White House Domestic Policy Council) and then a discussion by a panel of national and international poverty experts, including Wade Henderson (Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights), Barbara Ehrenreich (Nickel and Dimed), and Aparna Mathur (AEI).
 
For media inquiries, please contact Regan Lachapelle at lachapelle@cbpp.org.